In Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder (2012), Nassim Nicholas Taleb (@nntaleb) introduced Antifragility.

Some things benefit from shocks; they thrive and grow when exposed to volatility, randomness, disorder, and stressors and love adventure, risk, and uncertainty. Yet, in spite of the ubiquity of the phenomenon, there is no word for the exact opposite of fragile. Let us call it antifragile.

First, Taleb distinguishes between the fragile, robust, and antifragile (the Triad):

the fragile wants tranquility, the antifragile grows from disorder, and the robust doesn’t care too much.

Next, Taleb advances that

by grasping the mechanisms of antifragility we can…


In 2012, Freddie Lowe, Harish Pai, Jeremy Dibble, Johnathan Watkins (@jhwatkins3), Julius Hamelberg, Kirsten Erwin, Mark Noyce, Rick Fouts, and Sherry Westfield partnered with John Bartley, Gary Watkins, Joshua Greig, and Marie Johnson among others in an enterprise-scale business and technology transformation of AutoVIN, who is affiliated with ADESA and KAR Auction Services.

The transformation focused on greater organizational health and business outcomes — improved performance through greater creativity & innovativeness with efficiency & effectiveness, improved human well-being through less dysfunction, and greater internal integration and external adaptation.

This is their story . . . shared in their own words…


In 2010 and 2011, Clay Johnson (@clyjhnsn), Jacque Harper, Jim Sanders, John Manganaro, Jonathan Yenkin, Len Lagestee (@lagestee), Mahi Inampudi (@minampudi), and Nick Hummer partnered with Bill Swislow (@bswislow), Mitch Golub, Kayne Grau (@kaynegrau), Kevin Steele, Brian Neale, Nathan Spoonts, Sharon Knitter, Michael Page, and Joe Oliveri among others in an enterprise-scale business and technology transformation of Cars.com, who is affiliated with Classified Ventures.

The transformation focused on greater organizational health and business outcomes — improved performance through greater creativity & innovativeness with efficiency & effectiveness, improved human well-being through less dysfunction, and greater internal integration and external adaptation.

This…


In Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder, Nassim Nicholas Taleb introduces antifragility:

Some things benefit from shocks; they thrive and grow when exposed to volatility, randomness, disorder, and stressors and love adventure, risk, and uncertainty. Yet, in spite of the ubiquity of the phenomenon, there is no word for the exact opposite of fragile. Let us call it antifragile.

Taleb then distinguishes between the fragile, robust, and antifragile (the “Triad”):

The fragile wants tranquility, the antifragile grows from disorder, and the robust doesn’t care too much.

And, Taleb then advances that:

By grasping the mechanisms of antifragility we can build…


The PwC/PricewaterhouseCoopers International 16th Annual Global CEO Survey “Dealing with Disruption: Adapting to Survive and Thrive” emphasizes “the shift”:

During the past decade, we’ve seen economic volatility and disruption escalate to arguably unprecedented levels. In a globalised world — one where countries, economies and companies are more interconnected and interdependent than ever before — risks that once seemed improbable and even remote have become the norm. For business leaders across the world, ‘expect the unexpected’ has become the mantra.

The only way forward is to build organisations that can survive and thrive amidst disorder: organisations that are agile and adaptable…


As a consultant and coach, I am a catalyst or alchemist — a student of human nature and human dynamics in the context of the human condition. I have often explored the notion that ‘the human animal, with its human nature, is the most dangerous animal in its natural habitat’ — and experience has yet to falsify this notion.

Coaching

I appreciate the definition of coaching by the International Coach Federation (ICF):

Coaching is partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential.

And I appreciate Tom Landry’s articulation of a…


Today, business organizations experience unprecedented levels of disruption (turbulence) and can only expect the unexpected. While they must perform in a VUCA world (one characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity), their ability to OODA (observe, orient, decide, and act) is no longer enough to survive and thrive amid disorder. In this new chaotic reality, while agility is essential for adapting and surviving, antifragility is essential for evolving and thriving. Business organizations must embrace this new reality and emerge stronger.

In The Antifragility Edge: Antifragility in Practice, Si Alhir (Sinan SiAlhir) demystifies antifragility, explores how antifragility may be operationalized or put into practice by business organizations (at the individual, collective, and enterprise levels), and offers an actionable roadmap for how business organizations can achieve greater antifragility.

Visit www.antifragilityedge.com for more.

Antifragility Edge

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